That these honored dead shall not have died in vain

Nathan Hale, John Ballentine, Manuel Londo, William Wright, Daniel Bagnuolo, John Anders, Jacob Frazier.

As we enjoy the long Memorial Day weekend, we honor not only those men and women who gave their lives for our country, but their parents and other family members who are still coping with their loss and will never forget their loved ones.

But this Day should also be one where we re-examine ourselves, our values, our country’s future to ensure that our fallen men and women did not die in vain.  What do I mean by that?  Our country is at a crossroads.  We are trillions of dollars in debt, which we will be handing down to our children.

One in five Americans today rely on federal aid in obtaining housing, food, income, health care or education.  Illegal immigration is posing a national security threat to our country, as more people come across our borders, not to work, but to bring gang violence and drugs to our cities and communities.  Our economic livelihoods, our homes, are under siege, as politicians in Washington, and within our own states, argue about ideology first, rather than seek common ground.  Free speech in some quarters is also under attack from people and organizations who, if they don’t like what you say or write, can resort to methods of trying to silence you.  Just ask Rush Limbaugh, or more importantly, Patrick Frey.

Nathan Hale died in the Revolutionary War, John Ballentine at the Alamo, Manuel Londo in the Civil War, William Wright in WWI, Daniel Bagnuolo in WWII, John Anders in Vietnam, Jacob Frazier in Afghanistan.  These men fought for something.  They fought for an ideal, a way of life, a country where freedom of speech, religion, and the rights of the individual are sacrosanct.

As we plant our gardens, fire up the barbeque, go to the beach, attend graduation ceremonies, let’s remember why we can do those things, and those who gave their lives to ensure we can continue doing them.

R.I.P.

Thank you

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